Glenn Traylor

Is This Happening at Your Plant?

Glenn Traylor

At a recent TPI 3rd Party Audit, the In-Plant Inspector (IPI) and I were inspecting trusses coming off the line as is normal in an audit. A stacked truss caught my eye, mainly because the top plate did not line up with the plate on the opposite side of the truss. Upon careful examination, indeed...

#11242 Cover image
September 2019
Issue #11242
Page 38
Glenn Traylor

Do Connectors on Both Sides of a Truss Ever Need to be Placed Exactly?

Glenn Traylor

Once in a while, I’m asked—Is there ever an occasion when connectors on both sides of the truss need exact placement? Well, the answer might surprise you. There are, in fact, several situations where the top face connector and the bottom face connector need to be exactly...

#11239 Cover image
June 2019
Issue #11239
Page 38
Frank Woeste. P.E.

All Things Wood: The Critical Job of Truss Builders

Frank Woeste

Last month’s fine article by Glenn Traylor, “How Do I Choose Which Plates for a Critical Plate Inspection?”, reminded me of investigative experiences I’ve had throughout my career. The work of truss builders is extremely important, as evidenced by instances of truss...

#11239 Cover image
June 2019
Issue #11239
Page 56
Glenn Traylor

How Do I Choose Which Plates for a Critical Plate Inspection?

Glenn Traylor

The requirement is: an inspector will, on average, inspect one critical plate for every inspection made during a week. That requirement is the baseline number for the quantity of critical inspections to perform—but because some trusses do not have critical plates, it’s necessary to...

#11238 Cover image
May 2019
Issue #11238
Page 36
Glenn Traylor

What Decisions Should Truss Builders Be Able to Make?

Glenn Traylor

In the November 2017 article, “So Who Exactly is Responsible for Lumber Quality?”, we discuss the abundance of quality building materials and the responsibility of the fabricator to evaluate their application in products. We should recall the ultimate decision maker in determining...

#11237 Cover image
April 2019
Issue #11237
Page 34
Scott D. Coffman, P.E., SECB

Errors in Substituting Dead Load for Live Load in Wood Design

Scott Coffman

Introduction Custom kitchens, with high-end appliances, granite countertops, and central islands, are becoming more and more prevalent in the home market today. These products and finishes are heavy and the dead loads from the central islands and/or cabinets positioned along interior...

#10231 Cover image
October 2018
Issue #10231
Page 48
Glenn Traylor

What is the Most Common Fabrication Issue That Impacts a Truss?

Glenn Traylor

The most common problem typically encountered is excessive defects in the plated area of the truss. While some defects are acceptable in the plated area, the degree of defects depends on the actual joint situation and forces at the joint. Connector sizes are controlled by design, handling,...

#10229 Cover image
August 2018
Issue #10229
Page 32
Frank Woeste. P.E.

When Fashion Affects Structure—Floor Design Considerations for Preventing Tile and Stone Cracks

Frank Woeste

Two kinds of designers are involved in home construction—design professionals responsible for the structure and the interior-focused designers responsible for the final appearance. Although these roles can overlap, it is important for design professionals to be aware of in-service demands...

#10227 Cover image
June 2018
Issue #10227
Page 60
Glenn Traylor

So What is the Big Deal About Member to Member Gaps?

Glenn Traylor

Compliance with ANSI/TPI 1–2014 requires maintaining member to member gaps at less than 1/4 inch. An exception would be for floor truss chord splices where the limit is 1/16 inch. Let us take a look at two different situations, the first being a roof truss and the second being a 4 x 2...

#10215 Cover image
June 2017
Issue #10215
Page 30
Glenn Traylor

When is a Member Gap Not a Member Gap?

Glenn Traylor

Building trusses with tight member to member joints insures accurate truss profiles and consistency between setups. The member to member gaps are limited to 1/8” and 1/16” on floor truss chord splices. This requirement is primarily concerned with compressive joint situations where...

#09204 Cover image
July 2016
Issue #09204
Page 27

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